Friday, March 16, 2007

USB to Serial Adapter

My new laptop doesn't have a serial port. This is one of the great tragedies of modern laptops in my opinion. At least for situations where I want to connect to the serial port on a server or system with a serial port, I can use a USB to serial adapter like this adapter I bought at NewEgg. I tested it just now by connecting to the serial port on my old FreeBSD laptop.

First I enabled the serial port in /etc/ttys

#ttyd0 "/usr/libexec/getty std.9600" dialup off secure
ttyd0 "/usr/libexec/getty std.9600" dialup on secure

Then I restarted init to activate it.

# kill -HUP 1

On my Ubuntu laptop I attached the USB to serial adapter to a null modem and a gender changer, then connected it to the FreeBSD laptop serial port.

I installed cu(1) on Ubuntu

# apt-get install cu

then checked dmesg output to ensure I had a device to which I could connect.

[17213831.716000] usb 1-1: new full speed USB device using uhci_hcd and address 2
[17213831.876000] usb 1-1: configuration #1 chosen from 1 choice
[17213831.984000] usbcore: registered new driver usbserial
[17213831.984000] drivers/usb/serial/usb-serial.c: USB Serial support registered for generic
[17213831.984000] usbcore: registered new driver usbserial_generic
[17213831.984000] drivers/usb/serial/usb-serial.c: USB Serial Driver core
[17213831.988000] drivers/usb/serial/usb-serial.c: USB Serial support registered for pl2303
[17213831.992000] pl2303 1-1:1.0: pl2303 converter detected
[17213831.992000] usb 1-1: pl2303 converter now attached to ttyUSB0
[17213831.992000] usbcore: registered new driver pl2303
[17213831.992000] drivers/usb/serial/pl2303.c: Prolific PL2303 USB to serial adaptor driver

Now that I saw /dev/ttyUSB0 was enabled, I connected to it.

richard@neely:~$ cu -l /dev/ttyUSB0
Connected.

FreeBSD/i386 (orr.taosecurity.com) (ttyd0)

login: richard
Password:
Last login: Fri Mar 16 11:57:49 on ttyv1
Copyright (c) 1992-2006 The FreeBSD Project.
Copyright (c) 1979, 1980, 1983, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994
The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.

FreeBSD 6.1-SECURITY (GENERIC) #0: Wed Feb 14 15:33:28 UTC 2007

Welcome to FreeBSD!

That's it. If I needed to set a different speed I'd use the -s switch. For example, if 9600 above was 19200 in /etc/ttys, I'd use syntax like

richard@neely:~$ cu -l /dev/ttyUSB0 -s 19200

Now I know I can rely on this USB to serial adapter when I visit servers in the data center.

19 comments:

John Ward said...

Thats cool. I had the same problem with my laptop not having a Parallel port. You should remember my rewired SNES controller from back in the BATC days. Well, it requires that a particular pin have a 5V output, which not all parallel ports have. So I tried one of those USB adapters, but it didn't quite work. They make newer USB adapters for these controllers which I may pick up. So be wary, different standards may prevent your setup from working in all scenarios, but at least it is good to know that there is at least a baseline to work from if I ever come across this.

By the way, is that off of a Thinkpad? I noticed a bunch of those at Eclipsecon that had Parallel ports, but no serial port. Strange that the Dells are the exact opposite.

Anonymous said...

We have brought a bunch similar USB-RS232 converters at work for the same reasons.

The windows drivers are notoriously buggy, producing a blue screen if you use them for too long.

Babak Farrokhi said...
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pvaneynd said...

They also gave us one, but we have no end of problems with it. Sometimes the speed won't change or it cannot send a break.

The IBM serial+parallel port thing seems to work better.

Landon Lewis said...

I bought a similar adapter made by Keyspan. The 2.6.x kernel provides support for it, however Debian/Ubuntu disabled it b/c of the licensing model. So I had to recompile the kernel by hand. Not a big deal, but nothing "plug-n-pray" like your experience.

The device now works perfectly with minicom, cu, etc. I did however run into a problem using iWar in analog mode however. I would be interested to know if you get the same results with this adapter.

I blogged (in the link below) about iWar in VOIP mode and plan to write one about analog mode after resolving this issue.

http://www.digitalbond.com/index.php/2007/03/07/assessing-modems-with-iwar-voip-mode/

Ted Demopoulos said...

Interesting -- I just bought one yesterday for my "Vista" laptop, which probably means I'll have *some* problems like everything Vista.

That said, some people seem to have zero problems, others endless headaches.

I certainly agree the lack of Serial ports is a major nuisance!

Pete said...

Rich,

If you're doing a lot of work with serial I recommend using screen. It can auto-detect the speeds and settings you need.

-Pete

Anonymous said...

cool, i had done that in windows, so dun have the hassle of entering the commands. of course, i can do it with nix, but i guess the project was urgent during that period of time, so i have to use windows. But well, thats a nice piece of info to have.

http://hackathology.blogspot.com/

Richard Bejtlich said...

geek00l asked me in IRC about using this adapter to connect to Cisco gear. I connected the adapter to a rolled cable, and was able to access my Cisco switch.

Anonymous said...

i ahd try to follow the tutorial but it seem doesn't work. i cant' find /etc/ttys in my computer:
root@cceng:~# cd /etc/ttys
bash: cd: /etc/ttys: No such file or directory

do you guys have any other idea how can i use my usb to rs232 converter. Actually i want to use the usb to rs232 converter connected to ts7200 single board computer.

Anonymous said...
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Matt said...

Thanks for the article; I didn't know to check dmesg for things like new usb devices. Here I was looking for a linux driver for my Dynex USB to Serial adapter, when all along Ubuntu had plug & played the thing, loaded a driver and stuck it on /dev/ttyUSB0.

I never would have guessed that this adapter would just work after plugging it in. After typing cu -l /dev/ttyUSB0 I was magically connected to my cisco router I had hooked up to it. Amazing. Thanks again.

Pepe said...

It's so easy to set up, but i had a little trouble, could you please tell me how can i close a connection, I use to kill the process number but there should be another way to close, because when i connect again it shows a warning message

pp@pp-laptop:~$ cu -l /dev/ttyUSB0
cu: Stale lock /var/lock/LCK..ttyUSB0 held by process 25339 created 2008-09-02 16:42:57

cas said...

To disconnect a cu session type ~.

dghnfgj said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Richard Bejtlich said...

Run the minicom program and using command CTRL-a z o (inside minicom) to configure the minicom serial port. Make sure the configuration look like this.

A - Serial Device : /dev/ttyUSB0
B - Lockfile Location : /var/lock
C - Callin Program :
D - Callout Program :
E - Bps/Par/Bits : 9600 8N1
F - Hardware Flow Control : Yes
G - Software Flow Control : No

Richard Bejtlich said...

Windows driver (untested)

http://www.prolific.com.tw/eng/downloads.asp?ID=31

Leviana said...
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Leviana said...
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