Monday, March 08, 2010

Traffic Talk 10 Posted

I just noticed that my tenth edition of Traffic Talk, titled Pcapr.net -- where Web 2.0 meets network packet analysis, has been posted. From the article:

Solution provider takeaway: Pcapr.net is a free packet collaboration site hosted by Mu Dynamics. Solution providers can participate in the community to exchange, analyze and gather traces for testing products or processes for their customers, including network packet analysis.

Not many networking solution providers are happy with the apparently limited number of network traces available for testing their products or processes. Hardly a day goes by on a network-focused mailing list without a participant asking, "Where can I download network traffic to test X?" Fortunately for anyone who wants to take network traffic exchange to a new level, Mu Dynamics has answered the call. Its Pcapr.net site is the self-proclaimed "Web 2.0 for packets." In this edition of Traffic Talk, we'll take a tour of Pcapr.net to see what features it offers networking solution providers, including network packet analysis.

1 comment:

CChill said...

Packet analysis is a great application for cloud computing because it can require vast amounts of bandwidth to move the data along with large amounts of RAM, Storage, and CPU.

some other applications for cloud computing seem to me would be Network Management, CMDB, OSS, etc.

My personal experience is that vendors are being really slow, or not moving at all towards applications that can live in the cloud.

Most products dealing with Infrastructure or Security Management available today are very expensive, require dedicated hardware and storage, and don't scale well.

The cloud means we could build a skynet for security analysis. An open source cloud architecture for security analysis, where many individuals contribute to the systems ability to learn.

In your article about the NSA and military taking a larger role in network security, this is exactly what I thought.

For sure many of these private clouds exist and are operated by many companies, vendors, and educational institutions.

It's an economy of scale, and currently many, many people are analyzing the same data for contribution into these private clouds, but a lot of the information is not easily located, or compiled into a common framework everyone can understand.

Hence my prediction that the next big step will be an open security ( cloud (tm), with standardized data frameworks/apis, along with the tools, and resources needed to analyze the data, or write your own code to do with it whatever you want.