Friday, November 14, 2003

rying Fedora Core 1

Today I installed Fedora Core Release 1 in a VMWare session on my laptop. I was unable to using the CD-ROMs I burned and got the same error as described in this thread. I ended up installing the OS using the three .iso files on my laptop hard drive. I installed a default desktop into a 4 GB partition. Here are the daemons listening, the filesystem stats, and the uname output:

[root@localhost root]#netstat -natup
Active Internet connections (servers and established)
Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address Foreign Address State PID/Program name
tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:1026 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 1665/rpc.statd
tcp 0 0 127.0.0.1:1027 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 1830/xinetd
tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:111 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 1645/portmap
tcp 0 0 0.0.0.0:22 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 1814/sshd
tcp 0 0 127.0.0.1:631 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 1777/cupsd
tcp 0 0 127.0.0.1:25 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 1851/sendmail: acce
tcp 1 0 127.0.0.1:1034 127.0.0.1:631 CLOSE_WAIT 2103/eggcups
udp 0 0 0.0.0.0:1024 0.0.0.0:* 1665/rpc.statd
udp 0 0 0.0.0.0:993 0.0.0.0:* 1665/rpc.statd
udp 0 0 0.0.0.0:111 0.0.0.0:* 1645/portmap
udp 0 0 0.0.0.0:631 0.0.0.0:* 1777/cupsd
[root@localhost root]#df -h
Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/sda2 3.6G 1.9G 1.6G 54% /
/dev/sda1 99M 6.3M 88M 7% /boot
none 62M 0 62M 0% /dev/shm
[root@localhost root]#uname -a
Linux localhost.localdomain 2.4.22-1.2115.nptl #1
Wed Oct 29 15:42:51 EST 2003 i686 i686 i386 GNU/Linux

The coolest thing in my opinion was trying the yum (Yellow dog Updater, Modified) program. When fedora.redhat.com was down this afternoon I followed these instructions to add a backup source for yum. I then used yum to add nmap. It worked like a charm:

[root@localhost root]# yum install nmap
Gathering header information file(s) from server(s)
Server: Fedora Core 1 - i386 - Base
Server: Fedora Core 1 -- Fedora US mirror
Server: Fedroa Linux (stable) for Fedora Core 1 -- Fedora US mirror
Server: Fedora Core 1 updates -- Fedora US mirror
Server: Fedora Core 1 - i386 - Released Updates
Finding updated packages
Downloading needed headers
Resolving dependencies
Dependencies resolved
I will do the following:
[install: nmap 2:3.48-1.i386]
Is this ok [y/N]: y
Getting nmap-3.48-1.i386.rpm
nmap-3.48-1.i386.rpm 100% |=========================| 368 kB 00:02
Running test transaction:
Test transaction complete, Success!
nmap 100 % done 1/1
Installed: nmap 2:3.48-1.i386
Transaction(s) Complete

Unfortunately, since no package of ettercap was available, I couldn't try adding it. I then gave up2date a try. I used it too update packages on the system.

[root@localhost root]# up2date-nox -u
Fetching package list for channel: fedora-core-1...
Fetching http://fedora.redhat.com/releases/fedora-core-1/headers/header.info...
########################################
Fetching package list for channel: updates-released...
Fetching http://fedora.redhat.com/updates/released/fedora-core-1/headers/header.info...
########################################
Fetching Obsoletes list for channel: fedora-core-1...
Fetching Obsoletes list for channel: updates-released...
Fetching rpm headers...
########################################
Name Version Rel
----------------------------------------------------------
glibc 2.3.2 101.1 i686
glibc-common 2.3.2 101.1 i386
nscd 2.3.2 101.1 i386
Testing package set / solving RPM inter-dependencies...
########################################
glibc-2.3.2-101.1.i686.rpm: ########################## Done.
glibc-common-2.3.2-101.1.i3 ########################## Done.
nscd-2.3.2-101.1.i386.rpm: ########################## Done.
Preparing ########################################### [100%]
Installing...
1:glibc-common ########################################### [100%]
2:glibc ########################################### [100%]
Stopping sshd:[ OK ]
Starting sshd:[ OK ]
3:nscd ########################################### [100%]
[root@localhost root]#

up2date worked well too. I think I could like this distro.

I got an email from Red Hat explaining the new status of their products. From the email:

"Get Enterprise Linux in three ways:

--> Enterprise Linux WS: for desktop/client systems.
Starting at $179
--> Enterprise Linux ES: for small/mid-range servers.
Starting at $349
--> Enterprise Linux AS: for high-end and mission-critical systems.
Starting at $1499

>>compare all three:

http://info.redhat.com/a/tA-s$LDAJPSNNAOmLYvAK7ybs-q/utbn2"

Wow, those prices are amazing! I'll be interested to see who adopts this product.

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